Drug IBUPROFEN – Classification, Uses, Dosages, Common Side Effects, Interactions, Generic and Brand Name

IBUPROFEN – Classification, Uses, Dosages, Common Side Effects, Interactions, Generic and Brand Name

CLASSIFICATION: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug

USES:

It is used for treating pain, fever and inflammation. That includes migraines, rheumatoid arthritis, severe painful menstrual cramps, tooth aches, headaches.

It can be used via both mouth or intravenously.

DOSAGES:

Adult Dose for Dysmenorrhea:                                                                                                    

200-400 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.

Adult Dose for Osteoarthritis:

Initial dose: 400 to 800 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours.
Maintenance dose: May be increased to a maximum daily dose of 3200 mg based on patient response and tolerance.

Adult Dose for Rheumatoid Arthritis:

Initial dose: 400 to 800 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours.
Maintenance dose: May be increased to a maximum daily dose of 3200 mg based on patient response and tolerance.

Adult Dose for Pain or Fever:

Oral: Mild to moderate pain:
200 to 400 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed. Doses greater than 400 mg have not been proven to provide greater efficacy.

IV: (Patients should be well hydrated before IV ibuprofen administration):
Pain: 400 to 800 mg intravenously over 30 minutes every 6 hours as needed.
Fever: Initial: 400 mg intravenously over 30 minutes
Maintenance: 400 mg every 4 to 6 hours or 100 to 200 mg every 4 hours as needed.

Pediatric Dose for Fever or Pain:

Greater than 6 months to 12 years:
5 mg/kg/dose for temperature less than 102.5 degrees F (39.2 degrees C) orally every 6 to 8 hours as needed.
10 mg/kg/dose for temperature greater than or equal to 102.5 degrees F (39.2 degrees C) orally every 6 to 8 hours as needed.

The recommended maximum daily dose is 40 mg/kg.

OTC pediatric labeling (analgesic, antipyretic): 6 months to 11 years: 7.5 mg/kg/dose every 6 to 8 hours;

Maximum daily dose: 30 mg/kg

NOTE: Dosages can be given or taken as per physician’s instructions and guidance that depends upon the patient’s health condition

COMMON SIDE EFFECTS

Mild side effects are

  • Stomach pain
  • Heart burn
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Gas
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea

Serious Side effects (rarely occurs) are

  • Heart attack and stroke
  • Decreased kidney function and increased blood pressure
  • Ulcers and bleeding in the stomach and intestine (internal bleeding)
  • Allergies
  • Liver Failure

INTERACTIONS:

Drugs that may interact with ibuprofen include:

Antihypertensive medications: Drugs taken for high blood pressure, or hypertension. Ibuprofen can sometimes lead to a rise in blood pressure if used alongside antihypertensives.

Anti-inflammatory painkillers: Ibuprofen should not be taken with diclofenac (Voltarol), indometacin, or naproxen because there is an increased risk of stomach bleeding. Ibuprofen should not be necessary with these drugs, as they are already painkillers.

Aspirin: Ibuprofen and aspirin taken together significantly raise the risk of stomach bleeding. Patients taking low-dose aspirin for blood thinning should not take ibuprofen because the blood thinning effect will be diminished.

Digoxin: This is often used to treat atrial fibrillation. Ibuprofen and digoxin together can raise blood pressure levels.

Lithium: This drug is used for some mental disorders. Ibuprofen can make it harder for the body to eliminate lithium, resulting in potentially dangerous levels of lithium in the body.

Methotrexate: This is used to treat cancer and some auto-immune diseases. Ibuprofen can make it harder for the body to eliminate methotrexate. Potentially hazardous levels of methotrexate may build up in the body.

Tacrolimus: This drug is mainly used after an organ transplant, to stop the body’s immune system rejecting the new organ. Ibuprofen with tacrolimus can cause kidney damage.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs): This type of antidepressant drugs, such as citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline, taken with ibuprofen can increase the risk of bleeding.

Warfarin: An anticoagulant drug, or blood thinner, that stops the blood from clotting. Ibuprofen taken with warfarin can reduce the drug’s anticoagulant effects.

Alcohol : Drinking alcohol along with ibuprofen may lead to serious stomach bleeding.

GENERIC NAME: ibuprofen

BRAND NAMES:  Advil, Midol, Motrin, Motrin IB, Motrin Migraine Pain, Proprinal, Smart Sense Children’s Ibuprofen, PediaCare Children’s Pain Reliever/Fever Reducer, PediaCare Infant’s Pain Reliever/Fever Reducer

Classification, Uses, Dosages, Common Side Effects, Interactions, Generic and Brand NameClassification, Uses, Dosages, Common Side Effects, Interactions, Generic and Brand Name

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